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Is it Good News for Empty Nesters as the over 45s are cleared to adopt?


mother and son image Article by Fabafterfifty 

Is it good news for Empty-Nesters and a triumph over ageism asover-45s are cleared to adopt? 

Children’s minister Tim Laughton is quoted in today’s SundayTimes as  saying ‘empty-nesters’ in their late forties and fifties should be welcomed by adoption panels. 

Recognising the excellent parenting skills more mature  people have acquired in bring up their own
children, he argues that they could offer a much needed lifeline to older
children remaining in local authority care. Consequently  adoption guidelines have been reissued to ensure that age should not be a barrier to offering a child in need a loving home. 

It would appear to be triumph of common sense over political correctness. 

It’s not clear from the statement  if the guidelines apply to childless individuals or only those who have already had children. Nor is it clear if the revised guideline is only applicable in the case of adopting older children.  I have two childless friends who were told
they were too old in their forties to adopt , one in Canada and one in the UK, both successfully adopted children from China and have provided these children with loving family homes. Whether either would have considered adopting an older child I’m not too sure. 

How many women would consider adopting a child once their own had fled the nest?   Would you? Could you? 

An interesting thought, and one which is now potentially a real option

FabafterFifty

Fabafterfifty.com. Redefining 50. Celebrating the best half of our lives!

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  1. Kirsten Gronning

    February 26, 2011

    Re. the above Q: “How many women would consider adopting a child once their own had fled the nest? Would you? Could you? “
    A: Yes… and No.

    No, because right now I’m a single mother and I couldn’t afford to bring up another (adopted) child and offer them opportunities and the security they need and is likely to be hitherto unknown to them.

    Yes, I would (if circumstances were different) because I know without a doubt it would be the most rewarding thing I had ever done. As a foster carer fostering has enabled me to make a difference in the lives of the children and young people placed with me, but it has also enabled me to keep both a large roof over our heads and a home based business ticking over.

    Whether considering or even thinking about either adoption or fostering, if you’re serious please don’t wait until you’re an ‘Empty Nester.’ Do it now – find out what it entails, what your worst fears are (and whether they are just that – worst fears or are based in reality?) Aim to do something brilliant by adopting or fostering a child. Sooner, not later.

    • Ceri Wheeldon

      February 27, 2011

      Thank you for commenting Kirsten, I am sure there are many children who could be given a much better start in life through adoption and fostering. I wonder if any of our other readers are able to share their experiences of fostering or adopting a little later in life.

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