Welcome to Fab after Fifty

At Fab after Fifty we are passionate about women over fifty making the best of their lives. There has never been a better time to be 50! We'd love you to join in the conversation. Be Seen. Be Heard. Don’t be invisible. Be Fab after Fifty!

Join Free Today!

Join Our Community Today

Join a community of like-minded women making the second half of life the best half! The Fab after Fifty community is all about informing, sharing and inspiring.

It’s always good to share with friends- old and new, so why not make yourself a cup of coffee or pour a glass of wine and join in the conversation.

Get Started!

Style

Check out our latest style tips and picks to look fabulous over 50!

It’s always good to share with friends- old and new, so why not make yourself a cup of coffee or pour a glass of wine and join in the conversation.

Style

Diet and Fitness

The latest in nutrition and fitness to be healthy over 50!

Diet & Fitness

Beauty

Tips to look best possible fabulous YOU!

Beauty

Career

Whether you're setting up a business or looking for employment, make sure you're marketable over 50

Career

  1. Midlife Divorce: Stage 3 How to Rebuild Your Life

    Comment
    Article and Interview by Ceri Wheeldon The fourth and final interview in our video series with divorce mentor Liz Copeland as she looks at how to rebuild your life as the divorce process nears its completion.   Issues addressed in this video include: Rebuilding Your Life post Divorce  Self esteem/confidence may be at a low – how do you rebuild it and how important is it at this stage? When negotiating what you want in divorce proceedings how do you ensure that you have the strength to stand up for what you want? How do you do this without coming across as deranged or too aggressive? How do you handle how your soon to be ex husband’s behaviour through this?   The other videos in this series on divorce include: Video 1 outlines the 3  Stages of...
  2. Midlife Divorce: Stage 2 How to handle the practical and legal aspects

    Comment
    Article and interview by Ceri Wheeldon In this third video in our midlife divorce interview series with divorce mentor Liz Copeland, Liz discusses the practical and legal issues that need to be addressed as the divorce process progresses. Stage 2 Practical and legal What should somebody going through a divorce be doing at this stage? What is required in terms of financial information, lawyers, communicating with ex, entering negotiations etc. The other videos in our divorce interview series are: Video 1 outlines the 3  Stages of a Divorce – and the role a divorce mentor can play Video 2 covers Stage One of a Divorce – Coming to terms with the emotional aspects ...
  3. Midlife Divorce: Coming to terms with the emotional aspects

    Comment
    In this second of our video interviews discussing midlife divorce with divorce mentor Liz Copeland , Liz offers her tips on coping with the first stage of divorce – coming to terms with the emotional aspects and the changes that a divorce will bring to your life. These are just some of the questions Liz will address in this video interview. Stage One  of Divorce At the beginning – irrespective of who made the decision, there is a huge shift in life and mindset – what are the key issues people need to address at this stage? How much should you look to friends/family for support? Many women are used to being self sufficient – and don’t like to ask for help- what you advise them to do?   Other videos in our divorce interview series: ...
  4. Are You Ready to Become a Grandparent?

    Comment
    Article by Dr Lynda Shaw The role and demands on grandparents are changing because of new socio-economic pressures, so whilst you’re immersed in the anticipation and excitement of the new arrival, unexpected friction and conflict can often occur if you’re not prepared, according to cognitive psychologist Dr Lynda Shaw. “The role of the grandparents is ever changing.  Baby boomer grandparents may take on a huge chunk of the childcare responsibilities whilst mums return to work, whether it’s doing the school run, helping when the children are ill or stepping in to lend a hand during the school holidays.  This is not new in society.  But now and in the near future the sandwich generation will find themselves still working well into their sixties,...
  5. The Sandwich Generation: Are Women Bearing the Burden Well?

    Comment
    Article by Sandy Sidhu Back in the day, it was the norm for women to take on the role as full time carers and look after their parents within their own home.  But as times have changed, the pressures on women to bring up their own children, have a successful marriage and have a career, as well as caring for their elderly parents is greater than ever. The problem mainly lies in the fact that women are proud to be perceived as capable multitaskers who can do it all, but in reality, the enormity of each of these responsibilities can cause a knock on effect ultimately resulting in health decline and strain on the family.  With the constant juggling and striving for perfection in all of these duties, it has never been so...
  6. How to Support Relatives with Dementia at Christmas

    Comment
    Article by Maizie Mears-Owen Everyone wants Christmas to be magical but if your family includes someone living with dementia, that can present challenges which add to your stress levels. Maizie Mears-Owen, Care UK’s head of dementia services, offers advice on how support relatives with dementia at Christmas so that everyone can relax and feel loved and included in the festivities: Before the big day, get everyone together and have fun over the arts and crafts table. Christmas cards are easy to make and the shops have plenty of traditional paper chain kits which are the perfect way to engage an older person in the Christmas preparations. Why not gently lead loved ones living with dementia into the festive season and increase their wellbeing using a technique I have devised called the...
  7. The difficulty of having ageing parents

    Comment
      Watching your parents growing older is never an easy task. But have you ever stopped to think about how your parents themselves feel – especially if left to care for the other? Seeing the health, capabilities and senses of the man or woman you love deteriorating right before your eyes can cause a huge amount of strain: emotionally, physically and financially. Illnesses like dementia can change a person completely, while a decline in physical health can cause frustration and a complete change of lifestyle. If your parents are getting on a bit, with one healthy and one suffering from declining health, the healthy parent may well have told you that they are coping just fine. However, stop and think about the changes that need to be made. Watching the person they’ve committed...
  8. How does divorce affect family relations, in particular seeing your grandchildren?

    Comment
    Article by Ceri Wheeldon English life has never truly been the pastoral idyll some people would have us believe, but even so, life in England is moving further and further away from what it once was. Whether this is a good or bad thing is subjective, but there are certainly symptoms of this process that we can analyse. One example is the increasing utility of divorce proceedings across a broad spectrum of English life, including much later in life which historically has been very uncommon. This has been attributed a label: ‘Silver Separators‘.   Divorce affects people regardless of their age. There are a number of reasons why it is becoming more common, even as people get older. Largely, this can be placed with the fact that people are living for...
  9. Whats the best way to communicate with teenage grandchildren?

    3
    Article by By Dr Lynda Shaw Teenagers are notoriously difficult to communicate with, with parents often receiving no more than a couple of grunts to let them know that they are OK.  But grandparents can have a very special relationship with their grandchildren and play an integral role in the lives, so what is the best way to make the most of this and communicate effectively? Teenagers are less self-absorbed than we give them credit for and a lot of the time they are interested in hearing what their grandparents have to say, but it is up to the grandparent to make it relevant and interesting to the teenager. That’s not to say you need to know what’s number one in the music charts but you...
  10. Parenting teens. What is a normal teenager?

    Comment
      Article by Stephanie King HOW WE CAN ALL WORK TOGETHER In her second column, Stephanie King looks at what you expect from a ‘normal’ teenager. What Is Normal Teen Behaviour? Normal does not exist because it relies heavily upon perception, but perception varies from person-to-person depending on likes and dislikes, personal tolerances, upbringing, objective viewpoint, as well as what is or is not playing out. Let’s take another look from an overview angle. Life ticks past in seconds, minutes, hours and days. Before we know it, large chunks of time have passed. Not everything we do stems from conscious behaviour, indeed much more occurs automatically than we feed our conscious attention to. How we respond and interact with one another often falls right into this trap. From a very early age children learn to respond to life...
Skip to toolbar