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Check out our latest style tips and picks to look fabulous over 50!

It’s always good to share with friends- old and new, so why not make yourself a cup of coffee or pour a glass of wine and join in the conversation.

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The latest in nutrition and fitness to be healthy over 50!

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  1. How to support someone diagnosed with dementia

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    Tips from Wendy Mitchell Whether you know someone who has been living with dementia for years, someone recently diagnosed or would just like to better equipped in day to day life, there are simple things we can all do to help improve the lives for people living with the condition to help them feel part of their community. This week marks Dementia Action Week, previously known as Dementia Awareness Week, where Alzheimer’s Society are calling on everyone to unite and take actions, big or small,  to make a huge difference to people affected by dementia. To get involved this Dementia Action Week and unite against dementia, visit alzheimers.org.uk/DAW Top tips to best support someone living with dementia Alzheimer’s Society Ambassador Wendy Mitchell, 62, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease four years ago. To mark the...
  2. Coping with behavioural changes of dementia

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      Being verbally or physically attacked by an older adult with dementia comes as a shock. Even more so when the person you love or care for has shown no past history of violence. Yet aggression is a known symptom of dementia. In fact, it’s incredibly common. Find out why and how you can cope with it. Dementia changes a person When dementia sets in, it can change the way a person behaves in extraordinary ways. An older adult may start to shout or swear at you or scream repetitively which is deeply upsetting. Dementia patients can also cause physical harm by biting, scratching, kicking or hitting other people. Understandably, relatives often find it difficult to accept aggressive outbursts. However, it’s important to understand that this kind of behaviour is a...
  3. Nine Steps to Improve Insulin Sensitivity

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    Article by Fleur Brown According to Diabetes UK, nearly 3.6 million people are living with Diabetes Type 2 in the UK. Diabetes is the fastest growing health threat of our times and an urgent public health issue. Since 1996, the number of people living with diabetes has more than doubled. If nothing changes, it is estimated that more than five million people in the UK will have diabetes within the next five years. Diabetes Type 2 is primarily a disease of insulin “resistance” when the cells become insensitive to the effects of insulin. Insulin is needed to facilitate the uptake of glucose into the cells but if your cells are...
  4. Tips on managing joint pain

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      Actor and Radio Presenter Larry Lamb made a splash when he entered I’m A Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here last winter, lasting 19 days in the harsh, humid Australian jungle. Larry even dove into the trials, winning fourteen stars for his fellow (very hungry) campmates. A few years ago Larry wouldn’t have thought that he’d be capable of life in the jungle. Years of wear and tear on his knees meant that even simple exercises like crouching and bending put him in agony. Larry recently starred in a short video from GOPO®, where he explains that just a few years ago he struggled with his busy work schedule due to the pain in his knees. He even admits that he would have struggled to even consider the jungle...
  5. Natural Ways to Prevent Varicose Veins

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    By Debbie Cotton for CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine). Varicose veins are sore, raised, normally purplish coloured areas of blood vessels that occur most often on the legs. They form as a result of weak or faulty valves that are present within the veins, and the area becomes stagnated with blood, causing inflammation and further damage to the area. They are more common in people that have jobs in which they have to stand all day. The trouble with varicose veins is that once they have formed, they are quite tricky to make disappear, but what you can do is prevent them from forming or getting worse. If you are predisposed to prominent veins, it is a good idea to start a preventative treatment as soon as possible. Vitamin C is a...
  6. What is Lyme disease and how can you avoid it?

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    By Sally Wisbey for CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine). Lyme disease is a bacterial infection that was first noticed in the 1970s in America as being spread to humans by infected ticks. It is now thought also to be spread by mosquitos and horse flies.  Already rife in America and Germany, Lyme disease is becoming an epidemic in the UK, where it is carried by ticks commonly found on deer, sheep, foxes, horses, cats, dogs, small mammals and birds.  People who live or work near woodland or countryside are at greater risk but the disease has spread to city parks and gardens. Pets can also carry infected ticks into the home. What are the symptoms to look out for? Because Lyme disease affects many organs of the body, it mimics other conditions such...
  7. Is it possible to live to be 120? Biological v chronological age. Part 3

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      Article by Ceri Wheeldon The third article in our series on longevity, and changes we can make to live longer and healthier lives. According to scientists , a 120 year life span is feasible for people being born today.  But if we live longer, what can we do to ensure our later years are healthy and productive?  This is the second in a three part series where  I  asked Yuri Medzinovsky, Director General of Longevity & Beauty Residence GLMED, and some of his medical colleagues about the prospects for extending lifespan to 120 years (and staying active and healthy as well) There is a lot of information  which is why I have split the answers into three separate posts to make it a little easier to digest. Part one covered ...
  8. Is it possible to live to be 120? The role of telomeres and peptides in longevity . Part 2

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    Article by Ceri Wheeldon According to scientists , a 120 year life span is feasible, not for our generation, but  for people being born today.  But if we live longer, what can we do to ensure our later years are healthy and productive?  This is the second in a three part series where  I  asked Yuri Medzinovsky, Director General of Longevity & Beauty Residence GLMED, and some of his medical colleagues about the prospects for extending lifespan to 120 years (and staying active and healthy as well) There is a lot of information  which is why I have split the answers into three separate posts to make it a little easier to digest. This post covers the role of telomeres and peptides in longevity Part 1 talks specifically about lifestyle...
  9. Sugar and Alzheimers: 12 Steps to give up sugar for brain health

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    Article by Dr Marilyn Glenville Dementia affects more than 850,000 people in the UK and it is set to rise to over 1 million by 2025! However, not many people know that there is a strong link between sugar and Alzheimer’s. Almost 70% of people with type 2 diabetes are now known to develop Alzheimer’s, compared with only 10% of people without diabetes!  Dr Marilyn Glenville, the UK’s leading Nutritionist explains this phenomenon in her latest book Natural Solutions for Dementia and Alzheimer’s “The high levels of insulin block a group of enzymes that would normally break down the beta-amyloid proteins responsible for the brain plaques in Alzheimer’s. Although high levels of insulincan have this effect, confusingly the brain also...
  10. Brain health: 9 ways to give your brain a workout

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    Tips from Dr Marilyn Glenville   We can spend hours at the gym or running and hiking to train our body and endurance.  But what about our brain? Mental exercise is as important as physical exercise when it comes to healthy ageing. Increasing our neural pathways is key . If you feel like your attention span is shortening you can stretch and strengthen it with simple everyday changes. Get more Sleep Not sleeping properly can not only affect our energy levels and looks but also our brain functions. Getting enough Zzz’s can help support learning, memory as well as regulate our mood or even appetite and libido. When looking at the brain of someone who is sleep-deprived, scientists have found reduced metabolism and blood flow in multiple brain regions. Be Social Making friends and socialising...
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