Welcome to Fab after Fifty

At Fab after Fifty we are passionate about women over fifty making the best of their lives. There has never been a better time to be 50! We'd love you to join in the conversation. Be Seen. Be Heard. Don’t be invisible. Be Fab after Fifty!

Join Free Today!

Join Our Community Today

Join a community of like-minded women making the second half of life the best half! The Fab after Fifty community is all about informing, sharing and inspiring.

It’s always good to share with friends- old and new, so why not make yourself a cup of coffee or pour a glass of wine and join in the conversation.

Get Started!

Style

Check out our latest style tips and picks to look fabulous over 50!

It’s always good to share with friends- old and new, so why not make yourself a cup of coffee or pour a glass of wine and join in the conversation.

Style

Diet and Fitness

The latest in nutrition and fitness to be healthy over 50!

Diet & Fitness

Beauty

Tips to look best possible fabulous YOU!

Beauty

Career

Whether you're setting up a business or looking for employment, make sure you're marketable over 50

Career

  1. 8 Lifestyle Changes to help Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer

    Comment
    By Gemma Hurditch for CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine). According to official 2016 statistics, 1 in 8 women in the UK develops breast cancer. So what natural dietary and lifestyle measures can we take to reduce our risk? Fast.  Being overweight or obese is a risk factor for developing breast cancer. Maintaining a sensible weight is protective against many forms of cancer. Intermittent fasting or the 5:2 diet is a good way to lose excess weight and keep it off. Nightly fasting of 13 hours without food also appears to reduce the chance of breast cancer reoccurrence. Eat cruciferous vegetables. Compounds found in members of the cruciferous vegetable family; (broccoli, cabbage, Brussel’s sprouts, kale and turnips), contain anti-cancer properties, currently under investigation for breast cancer therapy. Keep cooking times to a...
  2. Herbal help for a sharp memory

    Comment
    By Jill R. Davies for CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine). Maintaining a healthy brain and a good sharp memory is something we would all wish for. The herb Ginkgo has received much public attention in recent years in connection with its ability to promote better mental clarity and recall, particularly in age-related memory loss. Ginkgo can be helpful on a number of counts. One of the herb’s main attributes is the ability to increase the flow of blood through ageing blood vessels, particularly in the brain.  This enhances memory, mental agility, alertness and other brain functions and eases some types of depression.  It aids the work of neurotransmitters in the brain, which in turn helps memory agility and enhancement. It also helps speed up the rate of information transmission, thus improving...
  3. Is Adult Incontinence the last taboo in women’s health? A new documentary

    Comment
    Article by Ceri Wheeldon With 1 in 3 women affected by adult incontinence, how can more open discussion be encouraged? In an industry first, Always Discreet for Sensitive Bladder releases a short documentary to help break the silence around the condition    “If another woman can be open about it, I can be open about it too, there’s no shame in it”, Sandra Small, age 53.   Inspired by the stories of real women across the country, UK film director Flora Berkeley has partnered with Always Discreet to create a ground-breaking documentary that aims to give a voice to the 1 in 3 women suffering from a condition that many feel reluctant to talk about; adult incontinence (AI).   Silenced by shame, nearly half (45%) of sufferers...
  4. 1 in 7 women attending mammograms never check their breasts for signs of cancer

    Comment
    1 in 7 women attending routine mammograms never check their breasts for signs of cancer Women aged 50-70 relying on NHS screening to spot breast cancer One in seven women aged 50 to 70 who attend routine breast screening1 are not checking their breasts for the signs and symptoms of breast cancer, according to new YouGov figures released today by Breast Cancer Care. Routine breast screening only takes place every three years, so it’s important that women check their breasts between mammograms as symptoms can occur at any time. The survey of 1,012 women aged 50 and over showed that, despite the majority of those aged 50 to 70 attending breast screening when they are invited (84%), one in seven (14%) never check their breasts outside these appointments. The...
  5. Is lack of awareness of gynaecological cancer putting women in danger?

    Comment
    Article by the Eve Appeal Despite gynaecological cancers being the second most common cancer among women in the UK and the world’s fourth biggest cancer killer, new research from gynaecological cancer research charity The Eve Appeal, today shows an alarming lack of awareness about the significance of identifying early signs and symptoms of gynaecological cancers.   Research from an Eve Appeal survey demonstrated that nearly three quarters of women (71%) have experienced a symptom which may be associated with gynaecological cancer, whilst a YouGov survey showed that nearly a fifth (19%) of women would wait 4 weeks or more before visiting a health professional about the main symptom associated with all gynaecological cancers – irregular vaginal bleeding. Furthermore nearly one in ten (8%) women would wait 4 weeks or more before seeking help...
  6. Worried about Osteoporosis? Probiotics can help!

    Comment
    During and after menopause, when oestrogen levels are low, the process of bone loss starts to speed up and it can lead to osteoporosis. However, according to the latest research published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, the ‘friendly’ bacteria in our gut can influence our bone health, and that giving women probiotic bacteria after menopause could help to prevent bone loss.* How? Cassandra Barns, Nutritionist explains, “We know that women’s levels of oestrogen go down after menopause, and that this decrease can lead to increased bone loss. One of the reasons why is that the lack of oestrogen may increase the permeability of the gut walls. This means that more substances – including toxins and microbes – can then get through into the body. In response, the immune system releases chemicals that increase inflammation, and...
  7. Breast Cancer – Can We Dodge the Bullet?

    Comment
    Article by Dr Kathleen Thompson     Currently one in eight UK women will experience breast cancer during their lives. It is now the commonest cancer in the UK—remarkable, considering it’s mainly a women’s illness (men account for 1% of cases) ­­—and the incidence is still rising, albeit more slowly than previously. I am a doctor, and a few years ago I had breast cancer. It taught me a great deal, and I’d like to advise you how you can reduce your breast cancer risk, or at least spot it early, to give yourself the best chance.   What Predisposes to Breast Cancer?   Data from a large number of studies indicate aspects of our lives which are definitely (strong evidence), or probably  (less evidence currently) associated with breast cancer. The Cancer Research UK website provides...
  8. Are we building a Dementia Friendly Society?

    Comment
    Article by Ceri Wheeldon Most of us today know someone whose life has been affected by dementia.  With an ageing population the incidence of those being diagnosed with dementia will continue to increase.I attended an online webinar talking about the challenges and some of the solutions facing us here in the UK. Looking ahead to 2030, the number of people living with dementia is estimated to increase to 76 million. The odds of getting dementia are 1 in 100 for those in their 60s, while it’s just 1 in 20 for those in their 70s I was amazed to learn that in some parts of the UK, only 20% of those with dementia are actually diagnosed.   So what are the key issues?   Professor Graham Stokes who is the Global Director of Dementia Care at Bupa...
  9. Shall we dance? : Health Benefits of Dancing over 50

    1
    Article by Anna Letitia Cook Why? Pleasure, passion, physical and mental health – Yes, dancing even makes you more intelligent! “After all, Ginger Rogers did everything that Fred Astaire did. She just did it backwards and in high heels.”  ? Ann Richards Apart from the stats from studies, I have living proof in the person of my best friend, Rhonda, same age as me, so 56 glorious years young, who dances regularly 3 or 4 times a week and now does exhibitions and competitions as well! You should see her jive 😉 She wiggles as well now as she did in her early 20s – lol. And, intelligence? She is now doing a degree in Psychology to top off an excellent career in business and refocus her talents into...
  10. Living with Arthritis

    Comment
    Post by Ceri Wheeldon Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live with arthritis?   Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live with arthritis? I have never really given arthritis too much thought in terms of how it affects everyday living. I came across this video which shows a young man wearing an arthritis simulation suit including adapted gloves and goggles etc. to mimic arthritis and show the difficulties encountered daily even in the simplest of tasks by those who suffer from the condition. It makes for interesting viewing and certainly makes you think! This video was created as part of the Seconds Matter Campaign in support of people with Arthritis. Premier Care created the campaign  with the main objective of raising awareness around a condition that affects one in five adults...
Skip to toolbar