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At Fab after Fifty we are passionate about women over fifty making the best of their lives. There has never been a better time to be 50! We'd love you to join in the conversation. Be Seen. Be Heard. Don’t be invisible. Be Fab after Fifty!

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Style

Check out our latest style tips and picks to look fabulous over 50!

It’s always good to share with friends- old and new, so why not make yourself a cup of coffee or pour a glass of wine and join in the conversation.

Style

Diet and Fitness

The latest in nutrition and fitness to be healthy over 50!

Diet & Fitness

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Tips to look best possible fabulous YOU!

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Whether you're setting up a business or looking for employment, make sure you're marketable over 50

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  1. What is Lyme disease and how can you avoid it?

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    By Sally Wisbey for CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine). Lyme disease is a bacterial infection that was first noticed in the 1970s in America as being spread to humans by infected ticks. It is now thought also to be spread by mosquitos and horse flies.  Already rife in America and Germany, Lyme disease is becoming an epidemic in the UK, where it is carried by ticks commonly found on deer, sheep, foxes, horses, cats, dogs, small mammals and birds.  People who live or work near woodland or countryside are at greater risk but the disease has spread to city parks and gardens. Pets can also carry infected ticks into the home. What are the symptoms to look out for? Because Lyme disease affects many organs of the body, it mimics other conditions such...
  2. Best books to help you through the menopause

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    Article by Ceri Wheeldon A round up of some of the best books to help you through the menopause. Some women sail through this period of life while others struggle – and not all doctors are well informed or sympathetic.  None of these books are intended to take the place of medical advice, but they do present the facts and demystify the menopause,  giving helpful tips, and providing information that you can build on in discussions with your medical professional if needed.  From exercise to diet, moods to weight gain – these books enable you to understand and navigate the menopause.   The Menopause Makeover by Staness Jokenos   One...
  3. Herbs for Digestive Health

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    By Angela MacRitchie for CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine). The digestive system starts in the mouth and is a tube that runs for nearly 9.0 meters from top to bottom – literally! It is a tunnel that permits the outside world to run throughout the body. The digestive system is divided into the mouth, the oesophagus, the stomach, the small intestine and the large intestine (also called ‘large bowel’ or ‘colon’) with accessory organs such as the salivary glands, liver, pancreas, and gallbladder. The digestive tract serves to transport, break down foods and provide us with essential nutrients, vitamins and minerals. Finally the waste is carried away from all the cells. When this system is out of balance or dis-eased, it causes a myriad of symptoms and knock-on effects in other areas of the...
  4. Looking after your mental health – how to give your brain a workout

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     Article by Ian Gilbert Use It Or Lose It Your brain is like a muscle and we all know what happens to our bodies if we don’t work out and keep in shape! Recent research is suggesting that, while we might never be able to keep some of those nasty brain problems away as we get older, keeping ourselves in shape mentally won’t do any harm in giving ourselves a fighting chance to ensure our brains stay sharp as long as possible. For every bit of research that tells us to practise Sudokus, do crosswords, watch Countdown, another group of boffins will tell you not to bother and that such activities have no discernible impact. To get to the bottom of this confusion, a recent review by the Global Council...
  5. How to Sleep Well – A comprehensive guide

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    Article by Ann McCracken (This excerpt is published with permission) This information is a helpful guide if you have a problem with sleeping,  use it with the Top Tips. It may take a few weeks to really establish a new sleep pattern so persevere, and if there is no improvement after 4 weeks, seek professional advice, as sleep is an essential part of your wellbeing. How much sleep do you need? The amount of sleep that each adult needs does vary, and is not the same for everyone. Most do require  between seven & eight hours during which time the brain is able to carry out essential internal  “housekeeping”, sorting & processing the day’s events which also then makes memory storage more  efficient. However, there are some who find they can manage on...
  6. Why can Nutrition seem confusing?

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    By Gemma Hurditch for CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine). High fat, low fat, lots of whole grains, no grains – the contradictions can be a recipe for extreme confusion.   Why are there so many conflicting dietary approaches for health and weight loss? Research One of the issues raised is who funds nutrition research. Do they have something to gain from a particular outcome? When funded by industry, some research may favour the desired company outcome, such as finding that something is not harmful to us after all! Even with independent research, other problems can crop up. For example, we were told that saturated fat was harmful to us, so is it ethical to feed a subject group high amounts of it in order to see whether it really is? Repeating the findings...
  7. How to manage your health when you are stressed

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    We all go through periods in life when stress takes its toll , whether dealing with divorce, bereavement, juggling with too many demands on your time. Last week Angelina Jolie spoke about how during a particularly stressful time in her life she neglected to put her health and wellbeing first and ended up suffering with Bells Palsy. Bells Palsy a condition that causes temporary weakness or paralysis of the muscles in one side of the face. If you, like Jolie, struggle with feeling stressed and low you are not alone – with 13.3 million working days lost per year due to stress, depression and anxiety in the UK, according to the Mental Health Foundation  We have spoken to  experts, Nutritionist Cassandra Barns and Dr Marilyn Glenville PHD, one of the UK’s leading Nutritionists,...
  8. Top Tips to Stay Mentally Sharp

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    It is a sad fact, but the older you get more likely you are to develop memory problems, and while it is more common once you are aged 65 years or over, the occurrence of ‘young-onset dementia’ or ‘working dementia’ does seem to be on the increase. Here at Fab after Fifty we want women to make the most of their lives once over 50 and here we bring you our guide to staying mentally sharp. The first thing to remember is you can manage the risk and a report this month noted that over a third of cases – 35 per cent to be exact – could be prevented just through some lifestyle changes. “Not all of the nine risk factors identified are easily...
  9. 10 simple tips to keep healthy at work

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    Holding meetings whilst walking around the office, lunchtime yoga classes and workplace running clubs are just some of the strategies Duncan Selbie, Chief Executive of Public Health England is supporting, according to The Observer. Selbie believes that small and medium-sized companies should apply these suggestions, to help boost employees wellbeing. We have asked our experts for other ways that we, ourselves, can support our health in the workplace… 10 tips to help you stay healthier at work 1. Does the shoe fit? You could spend less time sitting in traffic, or being cramped on a tube, by swapping public transport for your feet (or at least for part of the way), which can also help to up your step count. However, make sure your footwear fits properly to avoid discomfort....
  10. What should I be eating if I have high-cholesterol?

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    By Gemma Hurditch for CNM (College of Naturopathic Medicine). Cholesterol is a vital for our hormones and our cell membranes, for tissue repair and vitamin synthesis. Both high cholesterol and low cholesterol are linked to disease. With ‘high’ cholesterol, it is the oxidised (damaged) low density lipoproteins (LDL) known as ‘bad’ cholesterol that is believed to be the biggest nuisance. Factors contributing to oxidised LDL include; a diet high in trans fats (bakery sweets, deep fried foods), excess omega-6 oils (most plant oils) inadequate omega-3 (fish and flaxseed oils), high sugar intake, smoking, and poorly managed diabetes. Most of the cholesterol in our body is made by the body. Dietary cholesterol will only moderately elevate cholesterol levels (and only in susceptible people). More of a problem is a diet high in saturated fat, trans fat and sugar, as coupled with inflammation these promote natural...
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