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  1. Top tips to make your retirement as secure as possible

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    Article by Fabafterfifty Despite the doom and gloom of the economy and the raising of the state pension age, latest research conducted as part of the Changing Face of Retirement have found that nearly three quarters (72%) of 45-65s who aren’t retired still plan to retire between the ages of 61 and 70. This is a really positive statistic, especially with the continual negativity surrounding pensions in the press. John Lawson, Head of Pensions Policy at Standard Life has said: “The current financial crisis has brought into sharp focus the need to make and review appropriate plans. This will clearly be challenging but there are many things you can do to make your retirement years as secure as possible.” As part of the Changing Face of Retirement research, Standard life...
  2. Where You Choose to Retire can Affect Your Future Pension

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    Guest post If you are thinking of retiring abroad, be aware of how where you choose to retire to will affect your future pension. John Lawson, Head of Pensions Policy, Standard Life commented: “Retiring abroad is a dream for many people, but does require careful planning and advice. Many people think living abroad is cheaper than living in the UK, but this isn’t always the case. Doing your homework in advance of moving, matching your retirement income and expenditure, and making the appropriate decisions around purchasing an annuity or using income drawdown are key considerations. Your retirement income could also be subject to exchange rates and currency fluctuations, as well as local tax laws. Increases in UK State Pension “You also need to think about your state pension and what, if any, reciprocal agreement is in place. A...
  3. Does the Eldest in the Family Live Longer?

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    Article by Fabafterfifty Will you live longer than your younger siblings? And are you financially prepared? With life expectancy increasing, research has found that first born children are more likely to reach the age of 100 than siblings born later, largely be due to them being born when their mothers were young. Interesting research has found that longer life expectancy among first born children may largely be due to them being born when their mothers were of a young age. The research investigated centenarians born in the United States from 1890-1893, and found that first borns were more likely to cross the century mark than siblings who were born later. Although there has been a vast amount of research conducted into this, there still remains no definitive answer as to why this...
  4. How to Make Sure You are Employable over 50 as Pension Age is Raised

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    Article by Ceri  Wheeldon Are women in their 50s just realising how proposed pension changes affect them? Sarah Pennells  covered how the changes in state pensions will affect women in their 50s in a  recent Q & A (see full article), but proposed legislation  effectively means“, some women in their 50s will have to wait for up to two years longer to get their state pension. And that delay comes on top of the raising of the state pension age to 65 that’s already underway. Around half a million women will have to wait 2 more years for their pension Around half a million women will have to wait for a year or longer for their state...
  5. Pensions and Divorce. What’s Your Entitlement to Ex’s Pension?

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    Article by Sarah Pennells of SavvyWoman.co.uk Many women who get divorced don’t realise how important the pension can be. Don’t ignore it. For most couples who go through a divorce, deciding what happens to the family home is the biggest financial decision they have to make. It’s easy to see why. Your home is a tangible object and you can work out – reasonably easily – what it’s likely to be worth. It may also have huge emotional importance. The same cannot be said for a pension. It’s not only divorcing couples who find pensions a bit of a mystery, many divorce lawyers do as well. However, it can mean you lose out and – if you do – making up the shortfall can be difficult, if...
  6. The raising of the State Pension Age-What does it mean to you?

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    Article by Sarah Pennells Ceri  Wheeldon of Fabafterfifty.com asked Sarah Pennells of Savvywoman.co.uk  about  the proposed raising of the State Pension Age, and in particular the impact this will have on women and their pensions. What has already happened in respect to legislation so far? The government published the Pensions Bill in January which confirmed its plans to bring forward the raising of the state pension age to 66 by 2020. Since then it’s had its second reading in the House of Lords.  Last month an amendment to delay the timetable was narrowly defeated and it’s due to go back to the Lords on Tuesday 27th April. What is the situation today? Currently men receive their state pension at 65 and women get their pension at around 61 years...
  7. The importance of forward planning for future care!

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    Guest article  by Ade Oduyemi As the owner of a small business, I have something in common with many of my clients, employed, self employed, and a few – very few who are of independent means.  Ok I have several things in common with them, but in this case I refer to the desire, often unspoken often barely articulated, to provide the best possible standard of living for one’s self and family. At the end of it all, when one is no longer of this world – those of a more spiritual inclination would employ the expression ‘when one has gone to meet one’s maker’ one would like all one’s assets to go to the most important people in one’s life – with almost none of it going to hangers such as the state or the government in...
  8. How does the phasing out of the Default Retirement Age affect You?

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    Article by Fabaferfifty The default retirement age (DRA) will be phased out from 6 April 2011. From this date notices of compulsory retirement will be unlawful, other than where there is an employer justified retirement age Transitional arrangements Transitional arrangements will apply from 6 April 2011 where a retirement process has beeninitiated. Acas has provided the following guidance regarding the transitional arrangements:“Under the DRA employers must give a minimum of six months notice of retirement but no more than 12 months notice. Retirements notified on or before 5 April 2011 can continue  through to completion provided that the following conditions are met: The DRA procedure, as set out in the previous Employment Equality (Age) Regulations 2006, is followed correctly (including the employee’s right to request to stay on is given serious consideration...
  9. State Pension Age to be automatically Linked to Longevity

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    Article by Fabafterfifty How easy will it be to plan retirement?  The state pension age will be ‘automatically’ linked to rising life expectancy in future years, the Government said yesterday. We are living longer. Life expectancy for those aged 65 in 2009 was projected to be 21.1 years for men, who’d live to 86, and 23.8 years for women, who’d live to nearly 89. One in 7 of us could live to be 100. Pressure on providing state retirement benefits will be enormous. George Osborne said in his budget speech that linking the state pension age to rapidly increasing longevity will help Britain ‘live within its means’. He has not specified how this will work. The state pension age has already been increased to 66 with the speed of the changes...
  10. Ten things to consider before living abroad

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    Article by Fabafterfifty Have you dreamed of retiring abroad? A new life or retirement  in warmer or more relaxed country can be a dream many of us try to make a reality, but how easy is it for midlife women to pack up life at home and create a new life elsewhere. I talked to a number of women in their 50s and 60s who have done just that and taken up the expat lifestyle in the South of France. These are some of the key points resulting from my conversations. Think ahead of time about how much you will miss your family. A number of the women I spoke to said they had underestimated the impact of not being close once the first grandchild was born. Financial- can you afford to live comfortably –especially with the...
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